Shock waves

What are shock waves?

The ICATME Shock Wave unit at Hospital Quirón Dexeus has been in operation since 1999, being a pioneer in Barcelona in this type of treatment. Its head is Dr. Anunciación Español Barrull.

Shock waves are electromagnetic waves, very high energy ultrasounds that expand according to the laws of acoustics and, since tissues have acoustic properties similar to water, the pressure waves propagate in the body without causing damage to the surrounding tissues.

During the treatment the skin and the tissues it passes through are not damaged.

Clinical cases treated with extracorporeal shockwaves

Extracorporeal shock wave therapy, which is very effective in the treatment of kidney stones, is an effective form of treatment in orthopaedics.

Acute and chronic pain in the soft parts of the locomotor apparatus as well as bone consolidation problems are a difficult problem for both patient and doctor to solve.

Shockwave therapy is non-invasive and non-invasive, it triggers biological changes that lead to the formation of new blood vessels that lead to tissue regeneration and thus to healing.

Shockwave therapy is non-invasive and non-invasive, it triggers biological changes that cause new blood vessels to form, leading to tissue regeneration and consequently healing.

Tendinopatía calcificada del supraespinoso – Después de 4 sesiones
Tendinopatía calcificada del supraespinoso – Después de 4 sesiones
Mujer de 75 años. Fractura intertrocantérea fémur. 5 meses de evolución. 2 sesiones.
Mujer de 75 años. Fractura intertrocantérea fémur. 5 meses de evolución. 2 sesiones.

Analgesic effect

Shock waves have an analgesic effect by altering the stimulation sequence of pain mechanisms. The regenerative effect is conditioned by the ability to form new blood vessels that trigger biological processes, both in tendinitis and in bones, where after causing a fracture in the bone cortex, the formation of a new bone callus is triggered, just as it occurs in a fresh fracture.
Tendon calcifications eventually dissolve.
Chronic muscular pain is eventually eliminated by the direct action of the shock wave on the myofascial pain point or trigger point.

The number of sessions per patient varies, depending on the type of pathology and the evolution of the symptoms. It ranges from 3 to 6, although there is no limit to the number of sessions.

No serious side effects have been reported, only the appearance of petechiae or subcutaneous haematomas and slight skin erosions at the point of application after treatment, which disappear spontaneously. The application of local ice immediately after treatment minimises their appearance.

Shockwave treatment should be applied when the usual conservative treatments (rest, anti-inflammatory medication, physiotherapy, local infiltrations, rehabilitation, etc.) have not been successful and, if possible, before surgical treatment.

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